Prevalence, risk factors and outcomes of patients coming from the community with sepsis due to multidrug resistant bacteria

  • Nicolò Capsoni Department of Emergency Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
  • Pietro Bellone Department of Emergency Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
  • Stefano Aliberti | stefano.aliberti@unimi.it Fondazione IRCCS Ca'Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Respiratory Unit and Cystic Fibrosis Adult Center, Milan, Italy.
  • Giovanni Sotgiu Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Statistics Unit, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Medical Education and Professional Development Unit, AOU Sassari, University of Sassari - Research, Sassari, Italy.
  • Donatella Pavanello Department of Emergency Medicine -ASST-Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy.
  • Benedetto Visintin Acute Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
  • Elena Callisto Department of Emergency Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
  • Laura Saderi Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Statistics Unit, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Medical Education and Professional Development Unit, AOU Sassari, University of Sassari - Research, Sassari, Italy.
  • Davide Soldini Acute Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
  • Luca Lardera Acute Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
  • Valter Monzani Acute Internal Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.
  • Anna Maria Brambilla Department of Emergency Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

Background: Although previous studies showed an increasing prevalence of infections due to multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria in the community, specific data on sepsis are lacking. We aimed to assess prevalence, risk factors and outcomes of patients with sepsis due to MDR bacteria. Methods: An observational, retrospective study was conducted on consecutive adult patients coming from the community and admitted to the Policlinico Hospital, Milan, Italy, with a diagnosis of sepsis between January 2011 and December 2015. Primary study outcome was in-hospital mortality. Results: Among 518 patients, at least one MDR bacteria was isolated in 88 (17%). ESBL+ Enterobacteriaceae were the most prevalent MDR bacteria (9.7%) followed by MRSA (3.9%). Independent risk factors for sepsis due to MDR bacteria were septic shock (OR: 2.2; p = 0.002) and hospitalization in the previous 90 days (OR: 2.3; p = 0.003). Independent risk factors for sepsis due to ESBL+ bacteria were hospitalization in the previous 90 days (OR: 2.1; p = 0.02) and stroke (OR: 2.1; p = 0.04). A significantly higher mortality was detected among patients with vs. without MDR bacteria (40.2% vs. 23.1% respectively, p = 0.001). Independent risk factors for mortality among patients with sepsis were coagulation dysfunction (OR: 3.2; p = 0.03), septic shock (OR: 3.2; p = 0.003), and isolation of a MDR bacteria (OR: 4.6; p < 0.001). Conclusion: In light of the prevalence and impact of MDR bacteria causing sepsis in patients coming from the community, physicians should consider ESBL coverage when starting an empiric antibiotic therapy in patients with specific risk factors, especially in the presence of septic shock.

Dimensions

Altmetric

PlumX Metrics

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Published
2019-07-05
Info
Issue
Section
Original Research Articles
Keywords:
Septic shock, Pneumonia, MRSA, Pseudomonas, ESBL producer Enterobacteriaceae
Statistics
  • Abstract views: 541

  • PDF: 127
  • HTML: 12
How to Cite
Capsoni, N., Bellone, P., Aliberti, S., Sotgiu, G., Pavanello, D., Visintin, B., Callisto, E., Saderi, L., Soldini, D., Lardera, L., Monzani, V., & Brambilla, A. M. (2019). Prevalence, risk factors and outcomes of patients coming from the community with sepsis due to multidrug resistant bacteria. Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine, 14(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/mrm.2019.23