The influence of active and passive smoking on the cardiorespiratory fitness of adults

  • Andresa Thier de Borba In Health Promotion, University of Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
  • Renan Trevisan Jost Physiotherapy, University of Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
  • Ricardo Gass University of Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
  • Fúlvio Borges Nedel DSC in Epidemiology, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Santa Catarina, Brazil.
  • Dannuy Machado Cardoso Physiotherapy, University of Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
  • Hildegard Hedwig Pohl Physical Education. DSc in Regional Development, University of Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
  • Miriam Beatris Reckziegel MSc in Science of Human Movement, University of Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
  • Valeriano Antonio Corbellini DSc in Chemistry, University of Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.
  • Dulciane Nunes Paiva | dulciane@unisc.br Physiotherapy, DSc Medical Science, University of Santa Cruz do Sul (UNISC), Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, Brazil.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of active and passive smoking on cardiorespiratory responses in asymptomatic adults during a sub-maximal-exertion incremental test.

Methods: The participants (n = 43) were divided into three different groups: active smokers (n = 14; aged 36.5 ± 8 years), passive smokers (n = 14; aged 34.6 ± 11.9 years) and non-smokers (n = 15; aged 30 ± 8.1 years). They all answered the Test for Nicotine Dependence and underwent anthropometric evaluation, spirometry and ergospirometry according to the Bruce Treadmill Protocol.

Results: VO2max differed statistically between active and non-smokers groups (p < 0.001) and between non-smokers and passive group (p=0.022). However, there was no difference between the passive and active smokers groups (p=0.053). Negative and significant correlations occurred between VO2max and age (r = − 0.401, p = 0.044), percentage of body fat (r = − 0.429, p = 0.011), and waist circumference (WC) (r = − 0.382, p = 0.025).

Conclusion: VO2max was significantly higher in non-smokers compared to active smokers and passive smokers. However, the VO2max of passive smokers did not differ from active smokers.

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Published
2014-06-09
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Original Research Articles
Keywords:
Cardiovascular diseases, Exercise test, Oxygen consumption, Smoking
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How to Cite
Thier de Borba, A., Trevisan Jost, R., Gass, R., Borges Nedel, F., Machado Cardoso, D., Hedwig Pohl, H., Reckziegel, M. B., Corbellini, V. A., & Nunes Paiva, D. (2014). The influence of active and passive smoking on the cardiorespiratory fitness of adults. Multidisciplinary Respiratory Medicine, 9(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/mrm.2014.400